du0vkpwv4aax22p
 “Saint John,” by Mati Klarwein

The impulse to change is natural and a part of every human’s evolutionary process. And yet to some people, Change is terrifying—not just the idea of change happening to themselves, but happening to people they know (and even to total strangers).

As you set out on the path of Evolution, you may find that others—even those closest to you, ones who might have even initially encouraged the Change—will throw obstacles in your way.

wcqsw

Here’s a story that I’ve been thinking about lately, something that happened to me about…20 years ago. Nothing gory or spectacular, just a subtle thing. A conversation I had with a former boss, something that most people would have forgotten. I still think about the implications of that conversation.

This particular boss seemed like a pretty amiable sort of person. Younger Baby Boomer, very creative, middle-class upbringing, had a family of his own, and shared many of the same common cultural touchstones as our peers.

One day we were talking, and I said something like, “you have to do something that feels right for your soul.” Well, this apparently stopped the conversation dead—he just stopped and looked at me with confusion and disgust. “What did you say?”

light-clouds-grass-ground

Everything you encounter in your daily life is a mirror of what is already going on inside of you. It’s a mirror of your present state, containing potential clues and solutions to problems and questions you may face.

Many “problems” you may encounter are things that are merely reflections of answers, of solutions, of current states of being. Everything can be helpful. Nothing is wasted.

cosmic-circuit-man

“We are all giants, raised by pygmies, who have learned to walk with a perpetual mental crouch. Unleashing our full stature—our total brain power—is what this book is all about.”
—Robert Anton Wilson

I ran into Prometheus Rising and its author Robert Anton Wilson during a time in my life when I was trying to figure out why some people were assholes to other people. In my naïveté, I sought “granular” reasons for humanity’s inhumanity to others, training my magnifying glass on specific ideological and political issues. But these explanations were unsatisfying—and ultimately led down relativistic and semantic rabbit-holes.

There had to be a more basic reason. And there was.